Exciting New Research on Tunable Lighting at Care Center

In April I attended LightFair, an international lighting convention that meets every year.  The newest technology is shown their as well as 4 days of classes.  This past April this was held in San Diego.  I attended numerous classes in the newly created "Healthcare" category.  One that I was especially interested in was conducted by Connie Samla from SMUD (Sacramento Municipal Utility District.  In the class she talked about a project in which the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) was invited to participate.  This project involved a trial installation of a tunable LED lighting system in an ACC Care Center in Sacrament, CA.  The results are very exciting as the staff reported a number of health-related benefits.  These included a reduction in agitated behaviors, psychotropic and sleep medications were reduced for one of the residents, and a decrease in the number of patient falls which may be attributed at least in part to the change in lighting.  It was also reported that other residents were choosing the newly upgraded LED corridor to "hang-out" in.  

As I began Lumen Element my main question was, "what if lighting could make a difference in the lives of those living with Alzheimer's and other neuro-cognitive diseases".  This study and others that are beginning to come out support the idea that yes, lighting can have a positive impact on these individuals and others living in care communities.

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Feel the Light

Lighting And Human Health

Published: December 2015

By Craig DiLouie

Light doesn’t only serve as the basis of vision. It can influence behavior and how people feel. Further, light plays an important role in human health. As researchers gain insight into the relationship between light and health, the lighting industry is beginning to consider health effects in product and lighting design best practices.

Heart of the issue


At the core of one of light’s biggest effects on human health is its nonvisual effect on the body’s circadian system. The circadian system produces and regulates bodily functions based on 24-hour cycles, called circadian rhythms. Examples of circadian rhythms include sleep-wake cycles, core body temperature changes, and the release timing of hormones, such as melatonin. Disruption to circadian rhythms can lead to poor nighttime sleep and increased daytime napping as well as a greater risk of depression, obesity, diabetes and seasonal affective disorder.
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